A pebble dash stucco addition
                                                         on this old farm house
                                                         in Potomac Maryland
the electrical panel is mounted on a one inch spacerwe put on a layer of felt paper
      before we put on self-furring metal lath
Believe it or not, Tyvek is required and even inspected in Montgomery County.
Sounds kind of monopolistic to me.
Here, the electrical panel is mounted on a one inch spacer. You'll see why below.
I don't trust Tyvek anyway so we put on a layer of felt paper before we put on self-furring
metal lath.
We tore off the Tyvek back in 2003.
We capped the spacer and
      the electrical box with metal flashing.A gap between the bottom of the stucco and the porch.
Fast forward to the finished wall shows how
we capped the spacer and the electrical box
with metal flashing. This prevents any rot
behind the panel.
Porch was done in 2003 leaving a gap between
the bottom of the stucco and the porch.
This looks a lot neater than a sloppy gob
on the bottom.
Also the gap provides relief from building movement, drainage for the stucco, and
the ability to replace the boards in the future.

A piece of the
              finish floor material and a piece of masonite were used to
              gauge the plaster stop. These gaps should
              never be caulked ! The gap is a water exit for the
              stucco.
On the 2014 porch we put flashing on the ledger board.
 A piece of the finish floor material and a piece
of masonite were used to gauge the plaster
stop.
The new flooring will slide easily under the stop.
Porch roof from 2003 shows the gap between
the stucco and the flashing was never caulked.

These gaps should never be caulked !
The gap is a water exit for the stucco.
Pebble dash splatters all over the
              place. A view of my office.
The windows and even the soffits are covered with plastic and tape.
Pebble dash splatters all
over the place and the misssion is zero clean up.
A view of my office.
Mortar boxes are raised off the ground to
minimize bending and stooping.
Bags are stacked high to minimize lifting.